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20121201
20121231
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CSPAN 7
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the impetus for prioritizing the issue of poverty came from the other america, a best-selling study of poverty by holy cross alumnus michael harrington who found poverty hidden in appalachia and if america's inner -- and in america's inner cities. shriver accepted the challenge and got to work first of all researching the scope of the problem and its possible solutions. he found 30 million americans then live anything poverty -- living in poverty, and his agenda for them was not handouts, but employment through programs like the preschool head start program, a job corps to retrain adults for an increasingly postindustrial economy and vista, volunteers in service to america, often described as a domestic peace corps. there were programs stressing community leadership, local planning with federal funds, and there were legal services for the poor. in time the war on poverty raised up resentment from some public officials who were challenged by the fewly-empowered poor. newly-empowered poor. meanwhile, slowly but inexorably, the war in vietnam drew funding away from slave's operation. offered a ch
. there is no debt crisis in the united states of america and europe, and there is no such thing as the debt crisis in my own country, which is nevertheless being consumed by debt. you know the joke about balloonist. the balloon has been blown off isrse, and at some point they no such thing as a debt crisis. manage to gain control of the balloon and lower it above a farm. the farmer comes out and looks up at the balloon and one of the balloonists says, excuse me, sir, where are we? and the farmer says, you are in a balloon. the balloonist says, he must be an economist. precisely accurate, and hopelessly useless. [laughter] we have a doctor here amongst us. imagine if you had a terrible case of a cancer patient in acute pain, and your diagnosis was, the person is experiencing a pain crisis. it wouldn't be useful. debt is a symptom of 2008, to be precise. it is what happens when a financial implosion begins on wall street, and then all sorts of dark forces break out, break loose, and they start dismantling the economic and social fabric of the world. these awful events happen once every hundred years
of america. every time you come to this floor it's a question, why are we here? we are here to do the people's work. let's sit down. get it done. and move forward. instead of filling the agenda however worthy some of those initiatives may be, instead of not along with passing a middle income tax -- this is also reminiscent of a year ago. the president proposed, the house and senate, democrats and republicans, voted for the payroll tax holiday. the republicans in the house resisted. painted themselves into a corner until they had no choice. the issue had been made too hot for them to handle and they finally had to come around to supporting the payroll tax holiday. and here we are again. 100% of the american people will receive a tax cut when we pass the middle income tax cut. the wealthiest people in our country will receive a tax cut up to their income of $250,000. we are asking them to pay a little bit more for what they make over $250,000 a year. to help reduce the deficit, to help grow the economy, grow the economy. that growth is what is essential. you want to reduce the deficit, create
that was and the challenges facing us in 2013. first to our big stories of 2012. and america's left turn from the supreme court's landmark health care decision to the reelection of president barack obama. and politics headed in a decidedly liberal direction, so what happened and what does it mean for the country going forward. joining us columnist and detail editor, dani henninger and kim strassel. dan, we like to say for a long time we live in a center-right country. if you look at the last two presidential elections that doesn't seem to be the case. are we living now in a new, progressive era? >> in terms of the presidency, i think we are, paul. i'm not sure about the country. barack obama i think is the center left or left wing president since the great depression and i think that what barack obama has in mind to do is indeed to redistribute income from the top downward, not to cut spending, but to increase spending, it's explicit from a 20% of gdp to 25% gdp and rather than cut spending raise taxes as necessary to support that spending and i would say that is in fact essentially the french model. and
countries is stamped "made in america" and that's something to be proud of. something to be proud of. [cheers and applause] by the way, i hope the camera folks had a chance to take a look at some of the connects including that flag made out of connects and joe biden was in costco, he wanted to buy some of this stuff but i told him he had too much work to do. i wasn't going to have him building rollercoasters all day long. of course, santa delivers everywhere. i have been keeping my own naughty and nice list for washington. so you should keep your eye on who gets some connects this year. they're going to be some members of congress who get them and some who don't. [applause] this is a wonderful time of year. it's been a few weeks since a long election finally came to an end and obviously i couldn't be more honored to be back in the white house, but i'm already missing the time that i spent on the campaign visiting towns like this and talking to folks like you. >> we love you! >> i love you back. [cheers and applause] the benefits of traveling and getting out of the white house is it g
the targeted community depends heavily on. and we know america is aging. america is getting older every day. i think 10,000 people retire every day. by 2030 is as -- it is estimated 20% of the population will be aged 65 and over. this really targets services to an expanding population. next slide, please. the current funding formula for the older americans act, it is primarily based on age before title b and c and 7, the share of population age 60 and older, and for title 3e, the share of population which is 70 or older. the act also provide a minimal level of funding for each state. no state can receive less than half a percent in total appropriation. in 2012 these numbers were about 5.9 million and title seven, $108,000 respectively. the law also includes a provision, each state will receive a least as much as in the prior fiscal year. while the federal formula is based on age, the older americans act requires state programs to target prioritized services to that population with the greatest economic and social needs. these include factors like poverty, living at or below the poverty level,
of the impetus for prioritizing the issue of poverty came from the of america. the best-selling study of poverty by the holy cross alumni michael harrington who found poverty hidden in appellation and in america's inner cities. shriver is accepted the challenge and got to work first of all research and the scope of the problem and its possible solutions. she found 30 million americans then living in poverty, and his agenda for them was and handouts employment through programs like the preschool head program, a dhaka court to retrain adults for in the dhaka the postindustrial economy and vista volunteers in service to america often described as a domestic peace corps. there were programs come stress and community leadership, global planning with federal funds, and there were legal services for the poor. in time, the war on poverty raised up resentment from some public officials who were challenged by the newly uncovered poor. meanwhile, slowly but inexorably, the war on vietnam drew the funding away from shriver's operation and offered a choice between war and asia and in poverty. johnson relucta
, philadelphia, new york city, boston, the most congested corridor in the united states of america, that is the only 600 miles that we really own. we another small stretches around the commuter -- all the rest of amtrak service, over 20,000 miles of private freight rail. i see the main rail people in the audience and they have concerns too about using theirs and not having dedicated them and we need to address that issue as we move forward. final point is northeast quarter is where we should be putting the focus. give the administration credit for at least taking the money that has been turned back dedicating so that to the northeast quarter but we are doing it in a piecemeal, half baked fashion. the northeast corridor, every state, every major area can benefit by bringing high-speed rail to the northeast corridor. 70% of our air traffic delays emanate from the northeast corridor even when we have next-generation air traffic control, move planes faster and closer together with doubling of air-traffic, all of the other restrictions we have in that corridor, you must have high-speed
newman on the november jobs report and a discussion about public health in america with national institute of allergy director. washington journal begins live each morning, 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> we have had these explosions of knowledge in medicine but we have not coordinated care, and all these services we have end up having so many cracks that the cracks are as harmful as the diseases that we're treating, and you got to step back and ask, are we hurting people overall? on a global level, what are we doing sometimes? and of course, now we've got these reports saying, 30% of everything we do may not be necessary in healthcare? when we step back 30% of all the medications we prescribe, the tests we order, the procedures, this is something i think which is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the u.s. health care name. by unaccountable" on c-span 2. >> writer institute. i think a writer's institute is very important within the culture. we are a culture of words, of voices, words are key to our imagination, our capacity to envision thi
to change anything. they do not want to help america. what people are they for? the people have spoken, but they do not ever listen to the people. what people are the working for? host: james in new york as a deadline for independents. caller: i just want to point out something. 400% to 1000% increase in salaries versus the workers for the so-called job creators, along the way, the people are not making these increases in salaries. they talk about cutting taxes on the wealthy. well, what about giving money -- a fair percentage of an increase to the people that are doing the work? i never hear anything about that. it just seems to me that the unfairness starts there. host: that is james and new york. the lead story in this morning's boston globe with the headline "modest hope." [video clip] >> i just had a good and constructive discussion with senate and house leadership about how to prevent the tax hike on the middle class. i am optimistic that we may be able to reach an agreement that can pass both houses of in time. senators harry reid and mitch mcconnell are working on such an agree
just use my bank of america debit or credit card when i pay. and then i get up to 15% cash back... put into my account! i know, right? [ male announcer ] introducinbankamerideals, free for online banking customers. sign in to your online banking to choose your deals today. >> gretchen: 16 minutes after the top of the hour. if you are just waking up. it is usually a symbol of pride and patriotism. but the new flag polls seen in iran have a sinister meaning. the flag poles are electronic attenas used to jam communication and block their citizens from getting internet tv and radio signals. why? here with more is disa. good to see you. >> good to see you. >> gretchen: you have inside sources in the country of iran, why would they wanting to fool their citizens as to the real mission of the flag poles. >> the biggest threat to the regime since 2009 when the iranian government was caught off guard and saw the large presence on the internet and getting information from outside of the country and sending information from inside out. it was the twitter rev -- revolution. they were using youtube
across america? this is the reality we face? . we sent the bill to him that will protect 98% of american families and he will not call it on the floor. is he waiting for what is going to happen january 1 when consumer confidence is shaken across america, as everyone sees an increase in income-tax rates, including working families because he will not act? is he waiting for the doctors, as of january 1, the reimbursement for doctors goes down 20% -- 27%. is he waiting for that to happen or is he waiting his election to speaker? i hope it is not that. i hope he understands putting this off is not fair to america and is not been for the recovery. it will hurt us as we wait. there is no excuse. there is solid support among republicans and independents and democrats to make sure we protect working families and move forward. now the house is going home again. i do not know what we can accomplish but we certainly have depending on the floor major things that will help america. >> thank you. some other unfinished business, you have all seen on the tv screens the devastation. i have seen storms an
production is increasing, this quarter ford projects it will build 725,000 vehicles here in north america. they are increasing it by another 25,000 next quarter. and one other thing, carl, when we talked about importance of trucks. in november, ford had its best month for the f series since november of 2005 selling 56,000 f series trucks. that's an 18% increase compared to last year. you are really seeing the momentum building in terms of production in truck sales. >> yeah. up a fifth on f series. thank you very much. significant number. >> i bought my f series last year. great car. great job. f-350. not diesel. >> where do you keep that? >> it's part of our inn complex. >> got it. >> i assume we think gm might be good? 20 minute >> i think so. >> let's go to rick santelli in chicago. >> if you want to find out what's going on in the states, bob pisani is very accurately discussed, you have to look toward europe. so let's look toward europe. let's look at 24-hour charts. let's look at a 24-hour chart of the euro currency. started to do much better. you throw up the bund. many areas whethe
and get ambulances in. it's a mess. gregg: we are live from "america's newsroom" to elizabeth prann. elizabeth? >> reporter: hi, gregg. yeah, very unusual time of year for such destructive storms. in fact damaging tornados across the southeast. strong winds as far as texas. folks were celebrating their christmas evening as storms left00 of thousands of without power at any given time. the system moved through parts of alabama, georgia, mississippi and parts of florida. the biggest city to be hit by numerous rare winter twisters as well as powerful straight line winds. forecasters say there could have been as many as 19 tornados that ripped through the area. trees and power lines are on the ground, leaving debris in the roadway. folks in texas are feeling from where parts of the system originated. >> i tell you what. i never seen one in real life. just to hear one from that far away, that is a mile from where we are and you could still hear it. it was pretty amazing. >> as far as i know there is a small town, maybe 10 miles from here, lovelady. blew the roof off of a bank into anothe
the reputation for america as someplace that pays its debts hostage is a terrible idea. i'm hoping this will be a good precedent for getting the debt limit issue out of the way. and then there will be legitimate public policy debates about how much and what kind of spending cuts. >> congressman, this is dan greenhaus. let me say, you're hilarious and i'm going to miss you. jonathan tweeted, obama has utterly caved on taxes and inviting future hostage tactics by the gop. does that sound right to you? >> no. in the first place, he has insisted on raising taxes, letting taxes go up, is what we're doing, for people above a certain income level. he does not control the house of representatives. part of this issue, you know, people forget, the american people are the ones who set this stage. they voted for one set of people in 2008, then they changed their minds. at least those who voted, and voted for a different set of people in 2010. we have an unusual constitution. in america you're governed by the results of the last three elections, not just the last election in most other democrac
, latin america. four out of the top eight markets of the world, when you asked, do i care what i look like, latin america. the market for tupperware products in latin america, $1 billion, $22 billion in cosmetics. >> how are you going up against the competitor? because most people think avon as the vehicle for cosmetics. >> all of our latin american businesses are way up. they're up double digits. we're pleased with what's happening there. >> okay, rick, huge in france. we know french economy not that good. women want to make some money during this period. france is strong for you. >> we've grown, almost doubled the company in the last five years in france. we're the biggest company of our kind in france. we're the largest seller of cookbooks in france. we had some issues the first two quarters, during the election, as you know, most of the consumers sat on the sidelines. we're starting to see it come back to life again. so we feel very good about france. ditto germany. >> isn't that incredible. >> rick, 52-week high when compared to avon. incredible. thank you so much for joining us.
impact of latino generation. panelists include former white house advisor to latin -- latin america, executive director of the latino partnership for conservative principles, and arizona state university professor rodolfo espinoza. this event is two hours. >> good morning. we will go ahead and get started. welcome to the wilson center. this is, as you well know, a place where public policy and a research me to bring together the world of ideas with your world a policy action. very happy to have our director of the latin-american program. and of course, very pleased that this is an event we are co- sponsoring with immigration works that did most of the work for this. the president of emigration works really put the panel together, as well as very proud to co-concert arizona university. i want to acknowledge a senior scholar at the woodrow wilson center. and many other good friends here. good to see dan and rubber co and many others at the woodrow wilson center. there is no doubt the latino vote was important past election. we did not know how important this would be when we started t
americas one of the most famous apt slavery advocate. famous as a radical ab list in nist. he was perceived to be that way because of a series of features he had given. lincoln on the other hand because he didn't have a national record could convincingly portray himself as the least radical the least antislavery republican. who is up for the race. so they go in and sue ward doesn't just have the advantage of being the dominant republican and being the governor and senator from new york. he also have -- weed is the name. fan fastic name. it's like tom wolf. perfectly portrays hawaii, you know, nature. he's the fine -- mid 19th merge has to offer he has essentially financial resources in the darings when table could involve cash as well as anything else you imagine. that doesn't happen. of course not. enormous advantages. he's been to many conventions. he dominated most. he goes there in fact sue ward was not the republican nominee in 1856 they told him there was no way we were winning. you don't want to be the leader of losing cost. let's wait four years and we'll win. he read the politics r
of a handful of restaurants right here in america that serves patrons bugs. on purpose. chilli pepper seasoned crickets. even scorpions on shrimp toast. >> scorpions still have the stinger in them, but they are dried, so the poison is neutralized. >> scorpions are just one of 1700 bugs that are safe for people to consume. it's still a novelty here in the states, but insects are part of a daily diet in most of the world. earlier this year the united nations held a global conference on the benefits of eating insects. even suggesting it might be a good solution to world hunger. >> i don't know why the united states doesn't eat insects when they're actually very healthy for you. >> reporter: he is right. insects are high in protein, low in fat and cholesterol. take a cricket, for example. a six ounce serving of these crunchy bugs have 60% less saturated fat as the same amount of ground beef. >> now the ants. >> these string potatoes aren't complete without adding some dried ants. >> they taste a little sour, tangy, and they have a hint of black pepper to them. >> reporter: they also have 14 grams
of taking action. viagra. talk to your doctor. see if america's most prescribed ed treatment is right for you. ♪ i don't know what you've done to me but i know this much is true ♪ >> stephanie miller. ♪ i want to do bad things to you ♪ >> stephanie: disgusting things before we come back. there are some things that aren't appropriate for air. or for when we are about to come back. we've been talking about the commercial that tormented me my whole childhood. >> fun! wow! >> stephanie: it was for an amusement park called fantasy island near buffalo new york. you heard the sad news. >> a listener called in to let us know one of the founders of fantasy island passed away over the weekend. >> stephanie: right. [ wah wah ] >> kids, wow! >> open casket, wow. >> rigger mortgage is, wow. >> stephanie: maybe not all that was right for air. none of that was said during the you on eulogy. >> his family is in her thoughts. >> stephanie: now you can't -- >> cremation wow. >> stephanie: now i can't go home again e
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)